Dec 152019
 

Ella Hunt

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RANKED165 Ella Hunt is an English actress.


Born : 29 April 1998 ( 21 )

She is known for Intruders (2011), Les Misérables (2012), Robot Overlords (2014), and her starring role in Anna and the Apocalypse (2017). From 2016 until 2018, she played the role of Ellie Marsden in the ITV comedy series Cold Feet. As of 2019 she plays Sue Gilbert on the Apple TV+ web television series Dickinson.

Celebrity Ella Hunt

Dec 142019
 

Match Report

Highlights

League 1




It was an afternoon to forget for Pompey, who saw their long unbeaten run end with a heavy defeat at Accrington.

When the in-form Ronan Curtis headed them in front towards the end of the first half it seemed as though the Blues would continue their climb up the League One standings.

But Ellis Harrison nodded into his own net just before the break, with a finish that would have been lauded at the other end of the pitch.

And Stanley ran away with it after the break, with Dion Charles giving them the lead – albeit in controversial circumstances – before Colby Bishop added a brace.

Kenny Jackett made five changes from the side that drew with Peterborough on home soil the previous week.

The entire defence had to change, with Brandon Haunstrup (knee) and Lee Brown (Achilles) both injured, Christian Burgess suspended and Oli Hawkins recently becoming father to a baby boy.

That meant there were recalls for James Bolton and Anton Walkes in the full-back slots and Sean Raggett in the middle, while Tom Naylor also dropped into the back-line.

Ross McCrorie took the skipper’s midfield slot and Ryan Williams dropped to the bench to make way for Marcus Harness on the right.

Pompey started brightly and were camped out in their opponents’ half in the opening stages, but created only one decent opening.

Harrison’s cross from the left was just behind a stretching John Marquis, who could only send the ball over the bar and out of the ground.

Stanley then started to apply more pressure as the first half progressed and Jordan Clark was inches away from making a connection when he slid in at the far post.

Bishop was next to go close flashing a shot narrowly wide after Ben Close had initially made a fine challenge on Sam Finley.

It took a decent tackle from Ross Sykes to deny Marquis at the other end, with the striker almost being sent through by Harrison.

The hosts were still looking more dangerous, though, and when Clark met Seamus Conneely’s cross from deep on the left, Craig MacGillivray was forced to make a fine save to tip the ball over.

Pompey then started to pick up again, although Harrison and Marquis collided with Mark Hughes when all three players tried to get to Harness’ centre first.

Bolton was then unable to get enough on Curtis’ free-kick from the left and Josef Bursik made a simple stop.

But the Blues did go ahead on 35 minutes, as Harness whipped in a dangerous cross from the right and CURTIS stooped to meet it, sending the ball into the net off the inside of the post.

Jerome Opoku came close to hitting an immediate leveller, courtesy of an audacious long-range piledriver that cannoned back off the post.

And Accrington did equalise just before the break – although they received a big helping hand from the visitors.

Conneely sent a corner into the box and Harrison rose to meet it with a firm header that inadvertently sent the ball past MacGillivray and into his own net.


Half Time

Accrington Stanley 1

Portsmouth 1


The hosts had unsuccessfully appealed for two penalties before the break and were at it again when the action restarted.

This time it was Clark who felt he was unfairly upended by Walkes, but referee Martin Coy remained unimpressed.

Pompey then came close to retaking the lead when Harrison turned quickly outside the box and hit a fine strike that a diving Bursik did well to push clear.

Raggett soon did well at the other end to hold off Charles and stop the striker going one-on-one with MacGillivray.

But Charles did give Accrington the lead just past the hour mark, although the hosts were unhappy that the goal was allowed to stand.

Opoku held off Harness with a hand to the face, but it was not spotted by Coy and the left-back was able to square for his team-mate to slot home.

Jackett responded with a double change, as Harness and Marquis made way for Williams and Brett Pitman.

But Stanley almost extended their advantage just seconds later, as Bishop glanced a header against the post, with the loose ball hacked clear.

And Bishop did give them a cushion on 69 minutes, angling the ball into the net after MacGillivray had parried clear Finley’s initial effort.

Things soon got even worse for the visitors, as Bishop raced clear to slot home his second goal of the afternoon.

That came after Coy had played advantage following McCrorie’s challenge on Charles, but the referee went back to book the midfielder.

Accrington continued to look threatening as the minutes ticked down, while a neat Pitman flick was blocked before it could trouble Bursik.

That was as close as Pompey came to reducing their deficit, although the 733 travelling fans continued to cheer right up until the final whistle.

Accrington (4-4-2): Bursik; Johnson, Sykes, Hughes, Opoku; Clark, Finley (Diallo 90), Conneely (c), Pritchard; Bishop (Zanzala 90), Charles
Goals: Harrison 44 (og), Charles 62, Bishop 69, 77
Booked: Finley
Subs not used: Evtimov, Alese, Rodgers, Sherif, Carvalho

Pompey (4-2-3-1): MacGillivray; Bolton, Naylor (c), Raggett, Walkes; McCrorie, Close; Harness (Pitman 65), Marquis (Williams 65), Curtis; Harrison
Goals: Curtis 35
Booked: McCrorie
Subs not used: Bass, Downing, Casey, Cannon, Evans

Referee: Martin Coy

Attendance: 2,429 (733 Pompey fans)

Portsmouth FC

Dec 102019
 

Jim Smith

17 October 1940   –   10 December 2019



Former Pompey manager and assitant manager dies aged 79.

There was a good reason why Sir Alex Ferguson once said that Jim Smith, who has died at 79, was ‘legendary’ and that to be in his company was ‘one of the pleasures of my job’.

The South Yorkshireman’s glories were relatively sparse — promotions to the First Division with Oxford United and Birmingham City and to the Premier League with Derby County — but an hour or so in his company was precious to all who knew him.

‘The Bald Eagle’, as Smith was known, will be remembered for the humour, charm and humility he brought to a managerial career which took him to nine clubs and made him a part of the fabric of Oxford United, where he was eventually a director.

Smith brought an expansive brand of football, too. His own playing style, at Lincoln City and Colchester United, had been dour and he seemed to want to compensate for that, bringing Archie Gemmill and Frank Worthington to Birmingham City.

He loved Trevor Francis, selling him to Nottingham Forest for £1million while at St Andrew’s but buying him back at QPR.

And when things did not go to plan, he revealed that comedian’s timing which characterised some managers of that era.

‘Trevor told me he had a system for taking penalties,’ he said after Francis had missed one at Loftus Road. ‘I don’t know what it is but it’s obviously bloody useless…’

There was the same deadpan delivery when he was describing the challenging fit between functional English players and stylish continentals which he oversaw in those changing times — such as Italian midfielder Stefano Eranio at Derby.

‘He could stop the ball dead with his toe,’ Smith once said of Eranio.

‘One game, at half time, he said to our big, ugly centre half Spencer Prior, “Spencer, why you always put ball in stand? No players in stand”.’

At Derby, Smith unearthed Igor Stimac, Aljosa Asanovic and Paulo Wanchope for modest sums.

But Newcastle was his best shot at the big time. He arrived in 1988, declaring that ‘the day will come’ when he could call up Ferguson and ask for his best players. Newcastle fans are still waiting for it.

Money was flooding into the game and lining the pockets of agents in a way which made Smith, like so many of his managerial generation, deeply suspicious. ‘It’s turning into a spivs’ market place,’ he once said.

The man with deep pockets with whom he aligned himself was the millionaire publisher and former MP Robert Maxwell at Oxford, who he led from the Third Division to the First Division between 1982 and 1985. Maxwell wasn’t all bad, Smith always said, talking in football terms rather than about the Mirror pensions scandal.

It was when Maxwell refused him a pay rise that Smith moved on to QPR, only to suffer the indignity of being thumped 3-0 by his old club in the 1986 League Cup final.

He returned to Oxford in the twilight of his career, fighting a losing battle to keep them in the Football League. He handled that with style, just as always. Even the very worst of officialdom brought out his class.

‘I understand Walter Smith has described the referee as diabolical,’ he once said after a punishing afternoon at Everton. ‘I didn’t think he was as good as that.’

Obituries

Dec 082019
 

René Auberjonois

1 June 1940   –   8 December 2019



René Auberjonois, actor best known for his roles on the television shows “Benson” and “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” has died. He was 79.

The actor died Sunday of metastatic lung cancer at his home in Los Angeles his son Rèmy-Luc Auberjonois told the Associated Press.

René Auberjonois worked constantly as a character actor in several golden ages, from the dynamic theater of the 1960s to the cinema renaissance of the 1970s to the prime period of network television in the 1980s and ’90s — and each generation knew him for something different.

For film fans of the 1970s, he was Father John Mulcahy, the military chaplain who played straight man to the doctors’ antics in “MA.SH.” It was his first significant film role and the first of several for director Robert Altman.

For sitcom watchers of the 1980s, he was Clayton Runnymede Endicott III, the hopelessly highbrow chief of staff at a governor’s mansion on “Benson,” the ABC series whose title character was a butler played by Robert Guillaume.

And for sci-fi fans of the 1990s and convention-goers ever since, he was Odo, the shape-shifting Changeling and head of space-station security on “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.”

“I am all of those characters, and I love that,” Auberjonois said in a 2011 interview with the “Star Trek” website. “I also run into people, and they think I’m their cousin or their dry cleaner. I love that, too.”

Auberjonois was born in New York in 1940, the son of Fernand Auberjonois, Swiss-born foreign correspondent for U.S. newspapers, and the grandson of a Swiss post-Impressionist painter also named René Auberjonois.

The younger René Auberjonois was raised in New York, Paris and London, and for a time lived with his family in an artists’ colony in Rockland County, N.Y., whose residents included actors John Houseman, Helen Hayes and Burgess Meredith.

After graduating from Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Institute of Technology, now Carnegie Mellon, Auberjonois hopped around the country joining theater companies, eventually landing three roles on Broadway in 1968, including playing the Fool in a long-running version of “King Lear.”

The following year he would play Sebastian Baye opposite Katharine Hepburn in “Coco,” about the life of designer Coco Chanel that would earn him a Tony for best actor in a leading role in a musical.

He would later see Tony nominations for 1973’s “The Good Doctor,” 1984’s “Big River” and 1989’s “City of Angels.”

In 1970, Auberjonois began his run with Altman, playing Mulcahy in “MASH.”

In his most famous exchange from the movie, Sally Kellerman’s Margaret Houlihan wonders how such a degenerate doctor as Donald Sutherland’s Hawkeye Pierce could reach a position of responsibility in the U.S. Army.

A Bible-reading Auberjonois responds, deadpan: “He was drafted.”

“I actually made that line up when we were rehearsing the scene,” Auberjonois said on the podcast “The Gist” in 2016. “And it became a kind of an iconic line for the whole film.”

The same year he played an off-the-wall ornithologist in Altman’s “Brewster McCloud” and a saloonkeeper alongside Warren Beatty in the director’s western “McCabe & Mrs. Miller” in 1971. He appeared in Altman’s “Images” in 1972.

He spent much of the rest of the 1970s doing guest spots on TV before joining the cast of “Benson” in its second season in 1980, where he would remain for the rest of the show’s seven seasons, playing the patrician political advisor and chronic hypochondriac Endicott.

Much of his later career was spent doing voices for animation, most memorably as the French chef who sings the love song to fish-killing “Les Poissons” in Disney’s 1989 “The Little Mermaid.”

He played Odo on “Deep Space Nine” from 1993 to 1998 and became a regular at “Star Trek” conventions, where he raised money for Doctors Without Borders and signed autographs with a drawing of Odo’s bucket, where the character would store himself when he returned to his natural gelatinous state.

Auberjonois was also a regular on the ABC law-firm dramedy “Boston Legal” from 2004 to 2008.

Late in his career, Auberjonois would work with independent filmmakers including the artful director Kelly Reichardt, for whom he appeared in 2016’s “Certain Women” and 2019′s “First Cow,” his final role.

In addition to his son, he is survived by his wife of 56 years, writer Judith Auberjonois; sisters Marie-Laure Degener and Anne Auberjonois; daughter Tessa Auberjonois; son-in-law Adrian Latourelle; daughter-in-law Kate Nowlin; and three grandchildren.

Obituries

Dec 082019
 

Taylor Spreitler

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RANKED127 Taylor Spreitler is an American actress.


Born : 23 October 1993 ( 26 )

She is best known for her roles as Mia McCormick in the soap opera series Days of Our Lives (2009–2010), Lennox Scanlon in the sitcom Melissa & Joey (2010–15), and Kendra Gable in the sitcom Kevin Can Wait (2016–18).

Spreitler's films include the comedy 3 Day Test (2012), the action thriller The Contractor (2013), and the horror Amityville: The Awakening (2017).

Celebrity Taylor Spreitler