Jan 212020
 

Terry Jones

1 February 1942   –   21 January 2020



TereryJones, writer, actor and director, and member of Monty Python has died aged 77.

One morning Brian Cohen, completely naked, flung open the shutters at his bedroom window to find a mob below hailing him as the Messiah. Mrs Cohen, played by Terry Jones, who has died aged 77, had something to say about that. “He’s not the Messiah. He’s a very naughty boy,” she told the disappointed crowd. It became a classic cinema moment.

The 1979 film Monty Python’s Life of Brian, a satire about an ordinary Jewish boy mistaken for the Messiah, which Jones directed and co-wrote with his fellow Pythons Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle and Michael Palin, was banned by 39 British local authorities, and by Ireland and Norway. Jones and his chums were unrepentant: they even launched a Swedish poster campaign with the slogan: “So funny it was banned in Norway.”

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As for Jones’s performance as Mandy Cohen, it united two leading facets of the funnyman’s repertoire: his fondness for female impersonation, and his passion for historical revisionism. The latter was evident not just in his work for Monty Python – in which his historian’s sensibility proved essential to the satire of Arthurian England in Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975), which he co-directed and co-wrote – but also in several documentaries and books in which he stood up for what he took to be the misrepresented Middle Ages.

“We think of medieval England as being a place of unbelievable cruelty and darkness and superstition,” he said. “We think of it as all being about fair maidens in castles, and witch-burning, and a belief that the world was flat. Yet all these things are wrong.”

Arguably, without Jones, Monty Python’s Flying Circus (1969-74) would not have revolutionised British TV comedy. He was key in developing the show’s distinctively trippy, stream-of-consciousness format, where each surreal set-up (the Lumberjack Song, the upper-class twit of the year show, the dead parrot, or the fish-slapping dance) flowed into the next, unpunctuated by punchlines.

For all his directorial flair, though, Jones may well be best remembered for creating such characters as Arthur “Two Sheds” Jackson, Cardinal Biggles of the Spanish Inquisition, the Scottish poet Ewan McTeagle and the monstrous musician rodent beater in the mouse organ sketch who hits specially tuned mice with mallets.

Thanks to the show’s success, Jones was able to diversify into working as a writer, poet, librettist, film director, comedian, actor and historian. “I’ve been very lucky to have been able to act, write and direct and not have to choose just the one thing,” he said.

Jones was a second world war baby, born in Colwyn Bay, north Wales, and brought up by his mother, Dilys (nee Newnes), and grandmother, while his father, Alick Jones, was stationed with the RAF in India. He recalled meeting his father for the first time when he returned from war service: “Through plumes of steam at the end of the platform, he appeared – this lone figure in a forage cap and holding a kit bag. He ran over and kissed my mum, then my brother, then bent down and picked me up and planted one right on me. I’d only ever been kissed by the smooth lips of a lady up until that point, so his bristly moustache was quite disturbing.”

When he was four, the family moved to Surrey so his father could take up an appointment as a bank clerk. Terry attended primary school in Esher and the Royal Grammar school in Guildford. He studied English at St Edmund Hall, Oxford, and developed a lifelong interest in medieval history as a result of reading Chaucer.

At Oxford, he started the Experimental Theatre Company with his friend and contemporary Michael Rudman, performing everything from Brecht to cabaret. He also met Palin and the historian Robert Hewson, and collaborated with them on a satire on the death penalty called Hang Down Your Head and Die. It was set in a circus ring, with Jones playing the condemned man. He and Palin then worked together on the Oxford Revue, a satirical sketch show they performed at the 1964 Edinburgh festival, where he met David Frost as well as Chapman, Idle and Cleese.

After graduation, he was hired as a copywriter for Anglia Television and then taken on as a script editor at the BBC, where he worked as joke writer for BBC2’s Late Night Line-Up (1964-72). Jones and Palin became fixtures on the booming TV satire scene, writing for, among other BBC shows, The Frost Report (1966-67) and The Kathy Kirby Show (1964), as well as the ITV comedy sketch series Do Not Adjust Your Set (1967-69).

In 1967, he and Palin were invited to write and perform for Twice a Fortnight, a BBC sketch show that provided a training ground not only for a third of the Pythons (Jones and Palin), but two-thirds of the Goodies (Graeme Garden and Bill Oddie) and the co-creator of the 1980s political sitcom Yes Minister, Jonathan Lynn.

Jones and Palin wrote and starred in The Complete and Utter History of Britain (1969) for LWT. Its conceit was to relate historical incidents as if TV had existed at the time. In one sketch, Samuel Pepys was a chat show host; in another, a young couple of ancient Britons looking for their first home were shown around the brand-new Stonehenge. “It’s got character, charm – and a slab in the middle,” said the estate agent.

In the same year, he became one of the six founders of Monty Python’s Flying Circus. They expected the show to be quickly decommissioned by BBC bosses. “Every episode we’d be there biting our nails hoping someone might find it funny. Right up until the middle of the second series John Cleese’s mum was still sending him job adverts for supermarket managers cut out from her local newspaper,” Jones recalled. “It was only when they started receiving sackfuls of correspondence from school kids saying they loved it that we knew we were saved.”

After Python finished its run on TV, Jones went on to direct several films with the troupe. The first, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, was, he recalled, “a disaster when we first showed it. The audiences would laugh for the first five minutes and then silence, nothing. So we re-cut it. Then we’d show it in different cities, saying, ‘We’re worried about our film, would you come and look at it?’ And as a result people would come and they’d all be terribly worried about it too, so it was a nightmare.”

He had more fun co-writing and directing two series for the BBC called Ripping Yarns (1976-79) in which Palin starred as a series of heroic characters in mock-adventure stories, among them Across the Andes by Frog, and Roger of the Raj, sending up interwar literature aimed at schoolboys.

Jones directed and starred in Monty Python’s Life of Brian, which some religious groups denounced for supposedly mocking Christianity. Jones defended the film: “It wasn’t about what Christ was saying, but about the people who followed him – the ones who for the next 2,000 years would torture and kill each other because they couldn’t agree on what he was saying about peace and love.”

In 1983 he directed Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life, in which he made, perhaps, his most disgusting appearance, as Mr Creosote, a ludicrously obese diner, who is served dishes while vomiting repeatedly.

During this decade Jones diversified, proving there was life after Python. In 1980, he published Chaucer’s Knight: The Portrait of a Medieval Mercenary, arguing that the supposed paragon of Christian virtue could be demonstrated to be, if one studied the battles Chaucer claimed he was involved in, a typical, perhaps even vicious, mercenary. He also set out to overturn the idea of Richard II presented in the work of Shakespeare “who paints him more like sort of a weak … unmanly character”. Jones portrayed the king as a victim of spin: “There’s a possibility that Richard was actually a popular king,” he said.

He wrote children’s books, starting with The Saga of Erik the Viking (1983), which he composed originally for his son, Bill. A book of rhymes, The Curse of the Vampire’s Socks (1989), featured such characters as the Sewer Kangaroo and Moby Duck.

In 1987, he directed Personal Services, a film about the madam of a suburban brothel catering for older men, starring Julie Walters. The story was inspired by the experiences of the Streatham brothel-keeper Cynthia Payne. Jones proudly related that three of four films banned in Ireland were directed by him – The Life of Brian, The Meaning of Life and Personal Services.

Two years later, he directed Erik the Viking, a film adaptation of his book, with Tim Robbins in the title role of a young Norseman who declines to go into the family line of raping and pillaging. In 1996, he adapted Kenneth Grahame’s Wind in the Willows for the big screen, giving himself the role of Mr Toad, with Ratty and Mole played by Idle and Steve Coogan. But it was rarely screened in cinemas. “It was ruined by studio politicking between Disney and Columbia Tristar,” he said. “We made a really nice film but no one saw it. It didn’t make any money, even though it was well reviewed.”

Jones was also unfortunate with his next film project. Absolutely Anything, based on a script he wrote with the screenwriter Gavin Scott, concerned aliens coming to Earth and giving one person absolute power. Plans were scuppered when a movie with a similar premise, Bruce Almighty, starring Jim Carrey, was released in 2003. Only in 2015 did Jones manage to film Absolutely Anything, in which Simon Pegg, playing a mild-mannered schoolteacher, is given miraculous powers by a council of CGI aliens voiced by Jones and his former Monty Python colleagues. Robin Williams, in one of his last roles, voiced Pegg’s dog.

Jones made well-received history documentaries, including in 2002 The Hidden History of Egypt, The Hidden History of Rome and The Hidden History of Sex & Love, in which he examined the diets, hygiene, careers, sex lives and domestic arrangements of the ancient world, often appearing in the films as an ancient character, sometimes dressed as a woman.

In his book Who Murdered Chaucer? (2003), he wondered if the poet had been killed on behalf of King Henry IV for being politically troublesome.

He wrote for the Guardian, about the poll tax, nuclear power and the ozone layer. He became a vocal opponent of the Iraq war, and his articles on the subject were collected under the title Terry Jones’s War on the War on Terror (2004).

In his 2006 BBC series Barbarians, Jones sought to show that supposedly primitive Celts and savage Goths were nothing of the kind and that the ancient Greeks and Persians were neither as ineffectual nor as effete as the ancient Romans supposed. Best of all, he sought to demonstrate that it was not the Vandals and other north European tribes who destroyed Rome but Rome itself, thanks to the loss of its African tax base.

When Jones was asked what he would like on his tombstone, he did not want to be remembered as a Python, perhaps surprisingly, but for his writing and historical work. “Maybe a description of me as a writer of children’s books or maybe as the man who restored Richard II’s reputation. I think those are my best bits.”

In 2016, it was announced that Jones had been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia, a form of dementia that impairs the ability to communicate. He and his family and friends spoke about his experiences to help others living with the condition.

Jones is survived by his second wife, Anna (nee Söderström), whom he married in 2012, and their daughter, Siri; and by Bill and Sally, the children of his first marriage, to Alison Telfer, which ended in divorce.

Obituries

 Posted by at 11:00 pm
Jan 212020
 

Match Report

Highlights

Leasing.com Trophy




Pompey reached the semi-finals of the Leasing.com Trophy by beating a spirited Scunthorpe side at Fratton Park.

John Marquis opened the scoring in the first half and the hosts looked comfortabe going in for the interval.

But their League Two opponents were the better side following the restart and Abo Eisa’s fine finish drew them level.

Cameron McGeehan quickly hit back with his first Blues goal, though, to ensure hopes of becoming the first club to successfully defend the silverware were maintained.

Kenny Jackett made six changes from the side that collected three points in the league at Bolton at the weekend.

Jack Whatmough was the most notable inclusion after almost 12 months out with a serious knee injury.

Gareth Evans returned to skipper the team, while Craig MacGillivray, Brandon Haunstrup, Ben Close and Ryan Williams also started.

The men to keep their place in the line-up were James Bolton, Sean Raggett, Marcus Harness, McGeehan and Marquis.

There was almost a nightmare start for Whatmough, as Eisa’s shot took a wicked deflection off the defender, but thankfully flew straight into MacGillivray’s arms.

Most of the action was taking place at the other end, though, and Evans saw his fierce drive beaten away by Iron keeper Rory Watson.

Raggett was unable to get on the end of a Haunstrup corner, while Harness saw his attempt blocked after Marquis sent the ball across the box.

But it was MARQUIS who broke the deadlock on 13 minutes, despite not being able to take Williams’ pass first time.

The striker instead bought the ball under control, spun sharply and neatly slotted home his ninth goal of the season.

It looked like Marquis was trying to add two points for a conversion moments later, as he blazed another effort high over the bar.

McGeehan did come close to doubling the lead later in the half, being afforded space to drift into the box and hitting a low drive inches past the post.

Evans then lifted a glorious pass over the top for Marquis to race on to and angle in a precise shot that was impressively kept out by Watson.

But it was Scunthorpe who almost added to the scoring just before the break, with MacGillivray diving acrobatically to his left to deny James Perch.

The resulting corner also caused trouble and Williams was grateful to see his clearance ricochet off an opposition player and out for a goal-kick.


Half Time

Portsmouth 1

Scunthorpe United 0


Pompey were forced to make a change soon after the restart when Bolton went down injured and had to come off.

The right-back did not seem in too much pain as he made his way from the pitch, with Christian Burgess on to replace him.

Scunthorpe then caused problems with a couple of corners that were unconvincingly dealt with by the hosts.

The League Two side were on top without really testing MacGillivray, although a thunderous 30-yard strike from Eisa fizzed narrowly off target.

And it was Eisa who levelled in impressive fashion just past the hour mark, with the winger cutting inside from the left and bending home a fine effort.

The Blues looked in trouble, but it took just four minutes for them to restore the lead with a quick breakaway goal.

A stumbling Harness kept his composure to slip a pass across to McGEEHAN, who was left in space to open his account for the club with a neat finish into the bottom corner.

The advantage was almost increased when Harness’ cut-back found Marquis moments later, but Watson saved well and then leapt on the loose ball.

Scunthorpe brought on Kevin van Veen – voted star man for the last round of the competition – and he sent a dangerous ball across the box that somehow evaded everyone.

The Fratton faithful sung about returning to Wembley, while the visitors tried their best to force another equaliser.

But Pompey held on for the win to take their place in Saturday night’s draw and continue their defence of the trophy.

Pompey (4-2-3-1): MacGillivray; Bolton (Burgess 49), Whatmough, Raggett, Haunstrup; Close, McGeehan; Harness (Naylor 88), Evans (c), Williams; Marquis
Goals: Marquis 13, McGeehan 66
Subs not used: Bass, Seddon, Cannon, Hackett-Fairchild, Hawkins

Scunthorpe (4-2-3-1): Watson; Sutton (Miller 89), McGahey, Bedeau, Brown; Perch (c), Lund; Gilliead, McAtee (Beestin 79), Eisa; Novak (van Veen 78)
Goals: Eisa 62
Subs not used: Collins, Butler, Rowe, Hornshaw

Referee: Kevin Johnson

Attendance: 5,382 (85 away fans)

Portsmouth FC

Jan 212020
 

The Edge Of Seventeen

Trailer


RATED7.3 Plot

Everyone knows that growing up is hard, and life is no easier for high school junior Nadine (Hailee Steinfeld), who is already at peak awkwardness when her all-star older brother Darian (Blake Jenner) starts dating her best friend Krista (Haley Lu Richardson). All at once, Nadine feels more alone than ever, until the unexpected friendship of a thoughtful boy (Hayden Szeto) gives her a glimmer of hope that things just might not be so terrible after all.

Summary

A quite fun coming of age drama/comedy. Woody Harrelson is brilliant is the deadpan but heart of gold school teacher.

Released

2016


Movies IMDb

Jan 192020
 

Natalie Dreyfuss

Home Gallery Video


RANKED99 Natalie Dreyfuss is an American actress.


Born : 25 February 1987 ( 32 )

She has had guest-starring roles on shows such as Burn Notice and The Shield. She also had a recurring role on the television series The Secret Life of the American Teenager.

Dreyfuss is the daughter of Kathy Kann, who works in Hollywood in wardrobe, and actor Lorin Dreyfuss, as well as the niece of actor Richard Dreyfuss.

Celebrity Natalie Dreyfuss

Jan 182020
 

Match Report

Highlights

League 1




Christian Burgess scored his first goal of the season to earn Pompey a hard-fought win at struggling Bolton.

The centre-back was quickest to the ball after Sean Raggett’s effort had been saved late in the first half.

League One’s basement club offered a stern challenge after the interval, but the Blues held on to give their large travelling army cause to celebrate.

Kenny Jackett made one change from the side that beat AFC Wimbledon on home soil the previous week.

John Marquis was rewarded for netting in three successive games by replacing Andy Cannon in the number 10 role.

The first half was not a thrilling affair, with both sides failing to make the most of promising situations.

Ethan Hamilton fired into the side netting for the hosts, while Raggett was unable to get on the end of a Ronan Curtis free-kick at the other end.

The visitors won a host of corners – many of them delivered by Steve Seddon – but none of them led to anything.

Curtis had the first decent opportunity midway through the first half, with an opportunistic long-range effort that had enough bend to trouble Remi Matthews in the opposition goal.

There was a scare at the other end when Raggett fouled Joe Dodoo as the striker tried to race through on goal.

Home fans and players were baying for a red card, but thankfully for the defender, referee Tom Nield only brandished a yellow one.

That perhaps led to a sense of injustice among the Wanderers faithful, who began appealing for everything.

Ellis Harrison seemed to be the main focus of their ire and there were demands for a red card when Toto Nisala went down – despite the defender being inadvertently tripped by his own keeper.

Nsiala was then called into action to make a timely block on Curtis’ shot after Marcus Harness had pulled the ball back into the box.

But Pompey did take the lead just before the interval, with three members of their back-line playing a key role in the goal.

Seddon whipped in a free-kick from the right and Raggett’s header was pushed clear by Matthews, only for BURGESS to follow up and lash the ball home.


Half Time

Bolton Wanderers 0

Portsmouth 1


The hosts looked much stronger once the action restarted and Dodoo headed narrowly over from a free-kick.

Dennis Politic’s fierce drive was then beaten away by Alex Bass, with Raggett on hand to nod the loose ball behind.

Pompey were struggling to keep their revived opponents at bay, forcing Jackett into a double switch just before the hour mark.

Harrison and Harness were the men withdrawn, with Cannon and a fit-again Ryan Williams on to replace them.

The latter was involved in a quick Blues break soon after, only to then lose possession and see Bolton launch forward.

Ronan Darcy sent in a cross that was turned towards goal by the lively Dodoo, but Chris O’Grady somehow failed to score from just a couple of yards out.

Pompey tried to threaten themselves and began to see more of the ball, without really troubling Matthews.

The keeper did struggle with another dangerous Seddon corner, although the danger eventually passed.

Bolton kept searching for an equaliser and Bass comfortably kept out Politic’s effort, while Josh Emmanuel fired over from outside the box.

Their best chance came on 83 minutes, with Bass getting down low to his left to push clear a low drive from Politic that was heading for the bottom corner.

But the Blues survived a nervy finale – including four minutes of added time – to celebrate a valuable away victory.

Bolton (4-1-2-1-2): Matthews; Emmanuel, Nsiala, Edwards (O’Grady 46), Fleming; Murphy; Hamilton, Lowe (c); Darcy (Hall 89); Dodoo, Politic
Booked: Edwards, Dodoo
Subs not used: Alexander, Senior, Brockbank, Graham, Thomason

Pompey (4-2-3-1): Bass; Bolton, Burgess, Raggett, Seddon; McGeehan, Naylor (c); Harness (Williams 56), Marquis, Curtis; Harrison (Cannon 56)
Goals: Burgess 42
Booked: Raggett, Harrison
Subs not used: MacGillivray, Whatmough, Haunstrup, Close, Hawkins

Referee: Tom Nield

Attendance: 13,407 (1,846 Pompey fans)

Portsmouth FC